Monthly Archives: March 2015

THe Shed – Last week to see it!

This may be the last week of THe Shed but we’re not winding down yet.

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our party spread

This last Monday we held a celebration party to thank everyone who helped make the 16 different projects unique and worthwhile.   I’m still totting up the final numbers, but so far there have been over 200 people who have directly participated with several thousand who have come to see the exhibitions.  Once all the data is in I will blog about this some more.

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the aftermath of fun and games in the Border Galleries

 

All of the people who were involved – and we had a contact for – were invited to come along and help us enjoy some yummy food and get into the party spirit in a special evening opening of the galleries.

We had a lovely comment on Facebook after the party, with Sarah, one of the contributors to Making a Festive Exhibition of Yourself saying

“Just wanted to say thank you very much for having us all this evening. The food was gorgeous and it was so nice being able to show Harry’s Daddy around the museum as well.”

If you have taken part and want to tell us about your experience then I’d love to hear from you #THShed or message us on Facebook or leave your comment below.

There is still time to come and see what you have been missing.  Life, Laws and Legacies with Carlisle’s original Tudor Dormont book is still on show alongside some review panels of some of our past projects alongside our fabulous museum collection objects in What’s in Store.

Make this last chance count!

 

Claire

What is THe Shed?  Click and find out.

What is THe Shed? Click and find out.

THe Shed – Terribly Modern Tudors

The newest exhibition Life, Laws and Legacies: Tudor Carlisle in Modern Perspective is up and running.  And we can brag about another first for THe Shed – this being the first time Carlisle’s Dormont Book (the original  handwritten document that lists all of Carlisle’s bylaws)  has been on show in Tullie House.  Project leader and guest blogger Eloise introduces the show

We’re now into March, and the final project has just gone up in The Shed! Come and explore Carlisle’s Tudor past through the Dormont Book, written in 1561, and help contribute to the exhibition with your own stories of life in Carlisle.

Tiny Tudor pointy hands

Tiny Tudor hands

It’s been a crazy few weeks getting the last of the materials together, from re-designing the information panels, to cutting up loads of tiny Tudor pointing hands! Thanks to Jill, Cathy, Ian and Cassie, we’re installed and ready for visitors!

The Dormont Book

The Dormont Book

 

 

 

 

Working with the Dormont Book has been a fascinating experience. I’ve always loved Tudor history, but reading some of the actual laws from Carlisle’s past has been a real eye-opener in learning just how much we have in common with the real people of Carlisle nearly 450 years ago.

Cathy installing our turbulent Tudor street scene!

Cathy installing our turbulent Tudor street scene!

 

 

 

 

From stopping your pigs escaping onto the street to women setting up their own businesses, the book is full of colourful examples of the laws which governed Carlisle, and the legacies of the early council and city officials who still play a part in modern society

 

See it in THe Shed until 29 March

THe Shed – Capturing Cumbria’s Voice

7 March to 23 March 2015

Steve and jenn

A brand new collaborative piece of work by two of Cumbria’s emerging artists is on now in THe Shed.

Steve Crook and Jenn Mattinson’s project uses photographs, sound effects and recorded interviews to create some fascinating insights into some of Cumbria’s residents.  For example, who knew that horse physiotherapy was practiced?  Now’s your time to find out!  Jenn as guest blogger tells us about their work:

Capturing Cumbria’s Voice  Social History in the making

We have been working on a project that explores the relationship between portrait photography, people’s stories and sound.

The lives of four folk from Cumbria was our focus. From a variety of social and economic backgrounds, Gordon, Ross, Dawn and Bob shared their passions, experiences, memories and personality through their willingness to be photographed and interviewed.  The result is a demonstration of how seemingly ordinary people living within our region are contributing to its unique social history.

The four selected profiles, that appear as a slideshow of images and sound, have been designed to capture interest from a wide ranging audience.  The people behind the profiles are very genuine, honest individuals at different points in their lives, expressing a real passion for their chosen subjects.  Themes include transport enthusiasm, aspirations to become a champion boxer, horse physiotherapy and a love of music.

In situ

In situ

Steve and I have married together a collection of artistic mediums – portrait photography, oral history, spoken word, poetry and sound effects – and hope that the result will reflect the ways in which different art forms can work together and complement each other to provide a slightly more unconventional way of showcasing and displaying artistic work.  This is our first artistic collaboration.

 

 

 

Here’s a little more about each artist:

Steve Crook’s photography belongs to a genre that combines portraiture and social documentation, inspired by the likes of Daniel Meadows, Tony Ray-Jones, Chris Killip and Larry Fink.  A great deal of his work is presented in the form of photostories or collections.  Recent projects include ‘Rare Breed’, a study of the members of Springfield Homing Club and ‘Jubilee, the way we were’, a series of portraits taken on the day of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.  Steve is currently working with descendants of World War One soldiers to create a photographic link between those who fought and those they fought for.

Jenn Mattinson is a freelance Creative Practitioner, specialising in oral history, sound and media, theatre and reminiscence.  She is passionate about working creatively in local communities, with young people, adults, the older generation and in an intergenerational context.  Jenn is currently working with Morecambe Bay Partnership to facilitate and deliver a four year oral history project centred on the inshore fishing communities across Morecambe Bay.  She is also leading a series of creative arts sessions for older people in West Cumbria and for people living with dementia at Theatre by the Lake in Keswick.

See it in the Work in Progress area of THe Shed until the 23rd.

Claire

 

What is THe Shed?  Click and find out.

What is THe Shed? Click and find out.

Tullie Time Travellers – Springwatch

We were promised sunshine for today’s Tullie Time Travellers session so we planned to head out into the gardens and look out for signs of spring. Not to be put off by cloudy skies we headed out anyway to see what we could find.

We started by splitting into 4 teams and doing a Spring Flower Scavenger Hunt. Our teams had to find and photograph 8 flowers – first team to get all 8 wins the scavenger hunt and gets themselves on the Tullie Shield.

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Rose, Izzie and Sammy (aka Team Ladybird) tracked down a patch of Daffodils in the Tullie House Garden

Team Lily (Charlotte, Maria and Lily) got a beautiful close up of the Helibore.

Team Lily (Charlotte, Maria and Lily) got a beautiful close up of the Helibore.

Mungo and Leon (aka Team Snail) knew their Miniature Narcissi from their Daffodils!

Mungo and Leon (aka Team Snail) knew their Miniature Narcissi from their Daffodils!

Team Paper Towel (we felt it best not to ask) snapped this pic in the Crocus patch

Team Paper Towel (we felt it best not to ask) snapped this pic in the Crocus patch

All the teams put in a lot of effort, but in the end it was down to the two teams of girls Team Labybird were off looking for green buds, when Team Lily headed back having found all 8!

After doing such a good job tracking down some spring flowers we set our nature hunters off to see if they could get photos of any of the birds or insects that call in to the gardens here at Tullie House. However, we soon realised that birds and sometimes even insects move a little too fast for our photographers in training!

"There was a bird there, honest!" Team Paper Towel (we're still not gonna ask!)

“There was a bird there, honest!” Team Paper Towel (we’re still not gonna ask!)

Team Snail didn't manage to find any of their namesake but they did find this lovely Woodlouse!

Team Snail didn’t manage to find any of their namesake but they did find this lovely Woodlouse!

Team Lily found the Lesser Spotted Lily crouching amongst the Daffodils

Team Lily found the Lesser Spotted Lily crouching amongst the Daffodils

Team Ladybird found these two cheeky monkeys hanging around by the Japanese Dogwood!

Team Ladybird found these two cheeky monkeys hanging around by the Japanese Dogwood!

When it got a bit cold we headed back inside to test our Time Traveller’s nature knowledge in our animal quiz – how would you do?

1. Can you name two of the three species of snake native to the UK?

2.The slow worm is a type of lizard with no legs, true or false?

3. The average mole weighs 80 grams, how many earthworms do they have to eat everyday? 5g, 20g, 50g or 100g?

4. What is the name for a group of cows?

5. All blackbirds are black. True of false?

6. Which of these animals is the fastest? A cheetah, peregrine falcon, snail or rabbit?

7. What type of animal is a barracuda?

8. What is the name for a group of toads?

9. What is the longest species of snake?

10. What is a vixen?

11. What do you call where an otter lives? A sett, a holt, a drey, or a nest?

12. Where are a grasshoppers ears located?

13. Which animal can sleep standing up? A cow, a horse or a sheep?

14. What is a baby kangaroo called?

15. Can ostriches fly?

Three of our teams tied for second place with 10 correct answers out of 15 – but the winners with an amazing 13 right answers was Team Paper Towel (better known as Bert and Matthew!) getting their names onto our Tullie Shield!

To finish off the session we stayed in the warmth and headed up to the Border Galleries to see if we could spot any animals amongst the objects on display, not including the natural history collection of course!

Team Lily got this great shot of our Flying Reiver on his horse.

Team Lily got this great shot of our Flying Reiver on his horse.

Team Paper Towel found this bird adorning one of the objects in our Medieval Carlisle display!

Team Paper Towel found this bird adorning one of the objects in our Medieval Carlisle display!

Team Ladybird spotted this great dish in Carlisle Life!

Team Ladybird spotted this great dish in Carlisle Life!

Team Snail spotted this miniature Border Reiver herding livestock in the Pele Tower diorama in the Reivers gallery!

Team Snail spotted this miniature Border Reiver herding livestock in the Pele Tower diorama in the Reivers gallery!

Don’t forget, the next Tullie Time Travellers is on Saturday 18 April and we’ll be looking at our ARTIST ROOMS Anselm Kiefer exhibition and making some of our own Kiefer inspired masterpieces. If you are or know a child aged 8-13 who would like to join the Time Travellers contact anna.smalley@tulliehouse.org

Answers to the quiz: 1. Grass snake, Adder or Smooth snake. 2. True. 3. 50g. 4. Herd. 5. False. 6. Peregrine Falcon. 7. Fish. 8. Knot. 9. Python. 10. Female fox. 11. a holt. 12. On its knees. 13. Horse. 14. Joey. 15. No.

THe Shed – #Photobomb!

The Roman in question

The Roman in question

There’s a fantastic opportunity to get your photographs on show in THe Shed.  Maybe you just prefer to see what everyone else has been up to…  Guest blogger Catherine tells you about the latest project to go on show and how you can get involved.

The latest instalment in THe Shed is our Roman Photobomb exhibition which was designed and co-curated by our Yak Yak youth panel.

Installation day

Installation day

The group are inviting visitors to take a mini roman to their favourite places in the county and then send us their photos to go on display in the museum.

Kate and Herdy

Mini Roman photobombs Kate and Herdy

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Mini Roman taking a dip

Mini Roman with Safron

Mini Roman with Safron

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The group also picked every-day objects with some significance to them, and our curator of archaeology found the Roman equivalents in our collection. In the exhibition, these objects sit side by side for visitors to make comparisons between old and new.

The exhibition is running for just one more week, so pick up a mini Roman today, and send us your photos to see your picture on display in Tullie House.

For more information about the Yak Yak youth panel, and how you can get involved, contact Catherine on catherine.moss-luffrum@tulliehouse.org, or visit our Yak Yak facebook page for more information.

 

What is THe Shed?  Click and find out.

What is THe Shed? Click and find out.

Object of the Month – March

Another month, another Object of the Month!

March’s Object of the Month has come from our costume collection, a rare bonnet from the 1840s.

bonnet

Etiquette demanded that your head should be covered in the 19th century. In the 1840s women wore lace caps indoors and bonnets outdoors. Fashion followed the young Queen Victoria and it was considered proper for a woman to shelter her face with a wide bonnet brim like this example.

Headwear fashion changed more often than other items of clothing. Hat styles changed annually but dresses lasted a decade. Although the bonnet shape stayed the same it was regularly updated with new trimmings and fabrics. Most women purchased a new hat each year. The less well off made do by covering an old hat themselves. Traditionally new clothes would be worn to the Easter service, for many this meant a new bonnet at Easter.

This rare bonnet is made from cane and net covered with brown velvet and silk.

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