Category Archives: Young People

Carlisle Youth Panel

Youth Panel

The Youth Panel is a group of active and enthusiastic young people based in the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery. We meet regularly to help curate exhibitions, create alternative labels for artefacts, and shape the youth programme.

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As a group of 14 to 21 year olds we put our own spin on the museum, which is now the proud winner of the Telegraph Family Friendly Museum Award 2015. As part of the museum’s inclusive approach for all ages, we play a part in making sure the exhibitions and museum spaces are designed to be suitable for everyone. As well as designing, creating and running our own exhibitions, we have made links with youth groups from other museums around the country to see how young people are shaping museums everywhere!

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THe Youth Panel are branching out to spread the value and meaning of culture to outside the confines of a museum, into our local society. Carlisle is overflowing with culture, history and art, yet the majority of residents and tourists miss out on the opportunity to experience it. Hundreds of tourists come into Carlisle from the train station, but follow the same familiar route to the main shops rather than reaching Carlisle’s Historical Quarter. Enter our most recent project- The Cultural Crawl app and map. The handy pocket sized map will be stocked free in the train station for tourists to pick up as they leave, and directs them to the spots on our Cultural Crawl.

The Citadel Station itself is the first point, the map then leading across the city towards The Guildhall, The Cathedral, Tullie House and Carlisle Castle. These points are only the tip of the iceberg for Carlisle’s history, and we hope in the future we’ll be able to expand the Crawl to cover as much of the rich culture as we can!

As tourists and residents follow the map around the city, summaries are available inside the leaflet, but it gets even better when you add a smartphone. By downloading the updated Tullie House app (available in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store), we can give them a sneak peek into what they would see at each attraction. Using the Augmented Reality function of the map, users can hold their smartphone over the map and see THe Youth Panel talk about some of the highlights and interesting facts from each. Also on the app, users can use sliding photos to compare old and new Carlisle, as well as look at animated images.

Through the app and the group itself, we hope to open up Carlisle’s history to residents and tourists alike, bringing together a community involving every age group!

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Check out the app on Apple-

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tullie-house/id952651174?mt=8 and Google Play-https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.montyfunk.tulliehouse&hl=en_GB and pick up your map from Carlisle Citadel Station!

Volunteers – Caldew School NCS Students Get Involved

On Saturday 28 November, the volunteer programme were delighted to welcome 22 pupils from Caldew School to complete a day of  ‘Social Action’ at Tullie House as the culmination of their National Citizen Scheme Award.DSCN1273

Nicky and John tell us about their day at Tullie and the work towards their award.

Last Saturday we completed our social action project at Tullie House Museum. As a group we developed and participated in three activities.  The focus of the day was thinking about visitors from the community with visual impairment.  This meant that one group created a sensory space in the garden, and another group researched and wrote scripts then recorded audio ‘labels’ for the Social History gallery. Finally the third and smallest group produced an NCS display, highlighting what the NCS programme involves and has to offer all young people.DSCN1287DSCN1276DSCN1302

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To give you some background, the NCS stands the National Citizen Service award and is open for all 16-17 year olds across England and Wales. It is a journey through a series of phases with its ethos being based on:

  • Challenge
  • Responsibility
  • Inspiration
  • Social mix
  • Independency
  • Social action

All of us who complete the NCS journey are awarded with a certificate signed by David Cameron (prime minister). However the skills and knowledge that we gain on the route are extremely valuable to wherever our futures lead.

We are all year 12 pupils from Caldew School.  The start of the course saw us go to Lockerbie Manor, an outdoor pursuits centre where we did a range of activities designed to build up our confidence and communication skills.  Then over the Autumn half term we visited various places within Carlisle and improved our understanding of the local community.  We also took inspiration from the local organisations which eventually led us to taking part in a social action project at Tullie House Museum.

Davie, one of the students summed their wish to participate perfectly saying “I’m here to give something back to the community” a sentiment echoed by all the students.

John Sander the NCS Co-ordinator from Carlisle United had these further comments to make:

“I am thrilled that the group have chosen to work in partnership with the city’s leading tourist attraction. The confidence and inspiration they will gain as this project develops will not only have a big effect on their futures but it will be something that they will always remember. Hopefully their endeavours both in raising the funding and then working at the museum will also have a long, lasting and beneficial effect on the city and people of Carlisle”

John Sander added:

“For most of these sixth formers who attend Caldew School the NCS journey has been a life changing experience. This relatively new government initiative has improved their employability and allowed the young people to build friendships and memories on both the away and home residential experiences that will last for ever. The work at Tullie House is now the icing on the cake that allows all these students to graduate”

What Nicky and John didn’t mention in their text above is that they also carried out fundraising  that meant Tullie House was able to benefit from £200 worth of plants for the garden and further £600 for the museum.  It is my intention to see these funds used to continue the work you have started.

I was very pleased to host these students and enable them to complete their award.  In addition, they have made a real contribution to their museum and created superb resources for visitors to enjoy for years to come.  It was a privilege for me work with these students who gave up their Saturday and worked solidly throughout the day to achieve their aims – even in the rain!  Well done and thank you all!.

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Claire – Volunteer Co-ordinator

The Family Friendly Museum Award 2015: The Winner

Some brilliant words from Jack about our recent win at Kids in Museums – a great blogger about museums – thank you Jack!

Jack's Adventures in Museum Land

The scores are in, the families have spoken, and the time has come to crown a new holder for the title of Most Family Friendly Museum in the UK. Previous winners have included museums such as the wonderful Horniman Museum in South London, the Haselmere Educational Museum in Surrey and everyone’s favourite conjoined museums, the Pitt Riverls and the Oxford University Natural History Museum.

Kids in Museums

That list alone should give you an idea of the level of overall awesome-ness that families and the team at Kids in Museums are looking for in their winners. The winners would have to be awesome, because this is the biggest museum award in Britain and the only one to give a powerful voice to families.

Before I tell you who won, I’d like to remind everyone of the shortlist from the length and breadth of the country:

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Creative Responses to Kiefer Unveiled!

As our ARTIST ROOMS Anselm Kiefer exhibition enters its final weeks we are unveiling some brilliant creative responses from groups that we have been working with – you can see these in the flesh by visiting Tullie House.

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Starting in the reception area we have an impressive display of torsos created during workshops with NACRO and Carlisle Key – two local organisations working with young people.

The workshops explored identity a key theme in Kiefer’s works. The young people thought about what makes us who we are, and how much of that is linked to a ‘national identity’.

sideThe resulting decorated mannequins are a representation of themelves; their inspirations, their aspirations, and the things that influence the direction they have taken and who they have become.

They range from being a celebration of the music they enjoy, the colours that make them smile, or a tribute to lost loved ones.

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The Tullie Toddlers were even inspired by the work of of our young people and created their own mannequin!

As well as the mannequins our Community Room is playing host to a large scale mixed media piece created by visitors to our Kiefer inspired Museums at Night event. The Mob Masterpiece uses some of Anselm Kiefer methods and media, and was created over the evening.

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Many hands make art work!

The work our family visitors created during February Half Term inspired by the exhibition is also still on display in the Community Room.

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As well as art works some of the young people we work with have also developed an innovative new gallery trail. Kiefer2Music explores the use of music and song lyrics as a way to express their thoughts and feelings about Kiefer’s work. You can check out the blog here https://kiefertomusic.wordpress.com/ or use your phone or tablet in the exhibition to experience the music and art works together!

That isn’t all – we have one more exciting response project to come. Local school James Rennie have been working with Prism Arts to develop an exhibition of creative responses to the Kiefer exhibition which will be on display in our garden from the 27 May!

Anselm Kiefer Young Peoples’ Project

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Tullie House has teamed up with Nacro and Carlisle Key to work with local young people on a project inspired by the work of Anselm Kiefer, whose works feature in our current ARTIST ROOMS Anselm Kiefer exhibition. Catherine our Young People Coordinator gives us an update of what they’ve been up to.

In the workshops the young people have been using mixed media on canvas to explore their own identities; what is it that makes us who we are, and how much of it is linked to a ‘national identity’?

collageThe young people have noticed that Kiefer uses a lot of different materials, and also includes text in some of his work, so during the workshops we have tried to achieve a similar effect by using collage, paint, stencils, and newsprint altogether on one piece.

They have been encouraged to use pictures, words, and phrases which bear some significance to their lives, and that represent them in some way. The groups have also been re-visiting, adding to, and reusing pieces that they have started in earlier sessions, which is also something that Kiefer does with his own work.

The groups have been working with local musician Steven Pearson to explore the use of music and song lyrics as a way of expressing their thoughts and feelings about Kiefer’s work. It can sometimes be hard to communicate personal responses to art work, and using another reference can make it easier. Steven has done some sessions which involve layering sounds, and mixing music in a similar way that Kiefer layers materials and mixes different artistic mediums.

The young people will be sharing a ‘musical tour’ with museum visitors, which through the use of QR codes will direct people in the gallery to songs on their ‘kiefer2music’ blog (coming soon), where the young people have chosen music they feel links to pieces of Kiefer’s artwork.

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The groups are working towards a larger-scale creative response to the exhibition, which will go on display in the museum reception in time for our Museums at Night event of Thursday 14 May, where the young people will be able to share the work they have been doing.

The project is supported by funding from ARTIST ROOMS who aim to engage ‘new’ young audiences (13 to 25 years old) across the UK with the ARTIST ROOMS collection and artists, in a meaningful and enjoyable way.

Living History – Dancing with a Difference!

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The Easter Holidays began with a bang last weekend when the Tullie House Border Galleries were brought to life through a dance project with a difference. Award winning local choreographer Adam Russell made an open call to Carlisle residents interested in trying their hand at contemporary dance. For six weeks the galleries were transformed into a dance studio, with rehearsals for three groups of amateur and professional dancers ranging from the age of eight to (nearly) eighty!

bgTheir hard work concluded in seven promenade dance performances for all of our weekend visitors, which began by the notorious ‘cursing stone’ in the museum underpass, moving through the galleries with scenes in the Victorian train carriages, on the roman wall, by the iron age hut, through the beautiful old house, and outside into the Jacobean gardens. The dancers told a compelling story inspired by the space and the time period it represented. The whole performance was accompanied by musician Madelaine Jones, who played beautifully bespoke pieces on the flute and on the keyboard to complement the dances.

It was fantastic to see the surprised faces of visitors who just came across the dancers in the gallery; emerging from the caves beating drums and sticks, or popping up from behind the Roman wall wearing red feathered helmets!IMG_0109

We have received some lovely responses from audience members, who ‘found the experience uplifting’, and thought ‘the dancers of all ages were very talented, and the theme that Adam Russell had created was very thought provoking’.

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We hope to continue using the museum in new and innovative ways, bringing the galleries to life through projects which bring the community together in this way. A huge Well Done and Thank You to everyone who took part and came along and watched!

Guest Post – ‘Dazzle’ When Painting Went to War

Mark Gibbs our Secondary Learning Officer gives us an update on one of his projects with local Secondary schools.

“This week one of the things I’ve been getting ready for is an Arts Award workshop for 15 year 7s from William Howard School. I’m really looking forward to it, particularly as it coincides with some of my own artistic interests. The workshop combines a number of subjects that are particularly current; the First World War commemorations, our visiting War Games exhibition from the V&A Museum of Childhood, and the upcoming ARTIST ROOMS: Anselm Kiefer exhibition [7th February- 7th June].

On Friday 5 December I lead an art workshop called ‘Dazzle – When painting went to war.’ It is a workshop which seeks to mix art and military history, followed by a visit to War Games.

With U-Boats around, how do you camouflage a huge ship, especially when the pesky sky keeps changing colour? One minute its grey then a bit of blue- you could splash a bit of everything on and hope for the best, or choose an average. Thing is, even if you are lucky with your colour choice, First World War ships were powered by coal, so there’s a huge smoke plume acting as a signpost for every periscope around.

Artist Norman Wilkinson, inspired by bird plumage came up with Dazzle camouflage- you don’t try and hide the ship, you try and to make it difficult to tell how far away it is, and even, which direction it’s steaming in. So this is why ships appeared in zebra-like, migraine inducing stripes as so;

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USS West Mahomet 1918 in dazzle camouflage Photo #: 19-N-1733, Naval History and Heritage Command website

In fact if you look closely it’s difficult to see where the ship ends. As an artist I’ve become a bit obsessed with these patterns and a have made a series of sculptures inspired by them and by the historic photographs of the ships. As so;

Dazzle- image embedded in resin on raku ceramic Mark Gibbs 2014 Detail

dazzleSo inspired by Wilkinson and his team of artists our students camouflaged some ship cut outs- learning about colour mixing, contrast and pattern, as they went. Then we held a competition, comparing designs against a selected sky colour [the carpet colour actually!] Only the most confusing survived, and here were our winners.

The Winning DesignsThis workshop was followed up by a full day outreach workshop lead by myself and artist Celia Burbush, focussing on Kiefer’s work. For day 2 we  made our own version of one of Kiefer’s monumental; ‘ploughed fields of history- splash it on an inch thick’ paintings…. That’s an official art historical term.

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Many thanks to Celia and the students from William Howard School.

Mark

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