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THe Shed – More Life, Laws and Legacies

THe Shed in Tullie House may now be closed but there’s still chance experience the Tudor themes from the last exhibition.  Our original Tudor building the ‘Guildhall’ is open for this week of the school holidays and again in May for the summer.

Eloise shares with us some information about the final Shed exhibition and the Guildhall.

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THe Shed exhibtion of Life, Laws and Legacies

The final shed exhibition, Life, Laws and Legacies has ended with the Mayor and Mayoress coming to re-open our treasured Guildhall Museum, which is the third oldest building in Carlisle after the Castle and Cathedral.

 

The Dormont Book

The Dormont Book

 

 

For those of you who missed seeing the City’s wonderful Dormont Book, there is a copy of the weird and wonderful old laws kept in the Guildhall, where you can see some of our treasures from Carlisle’s Tudor past.

 

You can see the huge iron bound Muniment chest where the City’s documents and treasure were stored, and also the world’s oldest sports trophies are housed in the Guildhall Museum.

Racing Bells

Racing Bells

 

 

These horse racing bells date from 1599 and older, and were given as prizes by the Tudor mayor and Lady Dacre.

 

The Guildhall

The Guildhall

Come and explore this beautiful oak beamed building, with its wattle and daub walls, and feel like you can step back in time. The men who signed the Dormont Book sat in these very rooms nearly 450 years ago.

 

Inside the Guildhall

Inside the Guildhall

Isaac Tully, whose family built Tullie House was a member of the merchants guild here. He still owes the Guild 40 shillings fine for allowing his sister to work in his shop!

 

So overall, are we really just terribly Modern Tudors? Well, yes, I think we might be!

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THe Shed – Terribly Modern Tudors

The newest exhibition Life, Laws and Legacies: Tudor Carlisle in Modern Perspective is up and running.  And we can brag about another first for THe Shed – this being the first time Carlisle’s Dormont Book (the original  handwritten document that lists all of Carlisle’s bylaws)  has been on show in Tullie House.  Project leader and guest blogger Eloise introduces the show

We’re now into March, and the final project has just gone up in The Shed! Come and explore Carlisle’s Tudor past through the Dormont Book, written in 1561, and help contribute to the exhibition with your own stories of life in Carlisle.

Tiny Tudor pointy hands

Tiny Tudor hands

It’s been a crazy few weeks getting the last of the materials together, from re-designing the information panels, to cutting up loads of tiny Tudor pointing hands! Thanks to Jill, Cathy, Ian and Cassie, we’re installed and ready for visitors!

The Dormont Book

The Dormont Book

 

 

 

 

Working with the Dormont Book has been a fascinating experience. I’ve always loved Tudor history, but reading some of the actual laws from Carlisle’s past has been a real eye-opener in learning just how much we have in common with the real people of Carlisle nearly 450 years ago.

Cathy installing our turbulent Tudor street scene!

Cathy installing our turbulent Tudor street scene!

 

 

 

 

From stopping your pigs escaping onto the street to women setting up their own businesses, the book is full of colourful examples of the laws which governed Carlisle, and the legacies of the early council and city officials who still play a part in modern society

 

See it in THe Shed until 29 March

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